What Do Black Spots in the Eye Mean?

At Georgia Eye Partners, we often see patients who experience symptoms they find troubling, especially when they have not yet experienced vision problems. One of these conditions is known as vitreous floaters and can be easily diagnosed.

Floaters appear as small black dots or threadlike strands in the vision that move away as you focus on them. They are usually caused by a buildup in small flecks of collagen, produced in the gel-like vitreous in the back of the eye. As you age, the vitreous shrinks, causing the collagen fibers to tear away and block light from reaching the retina.

The condition typically affects those aged 50 and above. Several other risk factors include:usually

  • Nearsightedness.
  • Eye surgery or trauma.
  • Diabetic retinopathy.
  • Eye inflammation.
  • Migraines.

While floaters may be annoying, many people forgo treatment and learn to ignore them over time. However, they could indicate the presence of a more serious, underlying condition. If you experience any of these five signs with floaters, we strongly recommend seeking medical treatment as soon as possible:

  • Sudden increase in the number of floaters.
  • Presence of floaters after surgery or trauma.
  • Eye pain.
  • Flashes of light.
  • Temporary vision loss.

Retinal detachment, retinal tear, and internal eye bleeding are the three most common conditions to blame when these symptoms appear. If not properly treated, they lead to permanent eye damage or even complete loss of vision.

To prepare for your vision exam, keep a log of symptoms you are experiencing or any medications you may be taking. Also, be sure to include questions you have for your eye care specialist.

Although severe retinal complications due to floaters are rare, early detection is important! To prevent vision damage or loss, schedule your appointment with Georgia Eye Partners when you experience floaters or any of the symptoms described above.

Posted in: News and Updates

Contact Us